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2018, Jan 31

For Evans discovered—and it has the force of an invention in photography—that the literal point of view of a photograph, where the camera stands during the making of a picture, can be so treated in an extended sequence or discourse as to become an intentional vehicle or embodiment of a cumulative point of view, a perspective of mind, of imagination, of moral judgment.

Trachtenberg, Alan. “A Book Nearly Anonymous.” In Reading American Photographs: Images as History, Mathew Brady to Walker Evans, 1st ed. New York, N.Y.: Hill and Wang, 1989, 250.

He’s writing about Evans’ American Photographs. I might not take a thought like this in the direction of “moral judgment,” but to point to “the literal point of view of a photograph, where the camera stands during the making of a picture” as always and already a choice that can be criticized as such strikes me as a very good thing. I’m pretty sure I talked about this in a short essay on Kitai Kazuo that now seems to have disappeared from the internet, for better or for worse.

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